Two African women harvesting a crop

Towards the 2021 UN Food Systems Summit

Expanding the original scope of the Ceres2030 project, this project will focus on the interrelation between nutrition and climate change and the results will provide options for country-level transition pathways towards sustainable food systems. 

Can we move beyond hunger and provide affordable healthy diets to all in a sustainable way?

To help answer this question, and as part of our contribution to the UN Food Systems Summit, IISD and IFPRI are taking a deep dive into the nexus of food systems, climate change and nutrition in three African countries, Ethiopia, Malawi and Nigeria. This new project builds on the work done in Ceres2030: Sustainable Solutions to End Hunger, and will seek to unpack how we can influence consumption patterns through policy interventions that will lead to better environmental and nutritional outcomes.

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The development dynamics and needs of low and middle-income countries, particularly in Africa, involve an increase in food consumption and production to address the nutritional requirements of their populations. This must be done while ensuring the environmental sustainability and the resilience of their agricultural practices. To achieve these goals effectively, policy pathways must favour synergies and limit the trade-offs between climate change, food systems and nutrition.  

This project will seek to build the evidence base for how food systems can be transformed to provide affordable healthy diets to all in a sustainable way while building on the models and data collected by the Ceres2030 project and extending our understanding of consumer preferences. For each country under study, we will determine how to improve nutritional outcomes through affordable healthy diets, while using a more climate resilient production system with fewer greenhouse gas emissions.


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The project has three components:

(1) Trade-off modeling and costing exercise: To deliver a price tag for public spending associated with the different projected pathways for each country. 

(2) Food demand behavior at the household level: To understand the drivers shaping food demand at the household level and their nutritional implications, including defining what constitutes a healthy diet, and identifying potential food policies and food system innovations to achieve them. 

(3) Country level engagement consultations: To link the research conducted in the previous two other components with the country institutional environment, stakeholders, and national food systems dialogues. There will be three rounds of consultations encompassing a variety of stakeholders from domestic actors to international donors. The consultations are designed to encourage feedback on the project and develop joint ownership of the recommendations with national stakeholders to maximize the use of the findings. 

Consultations with national governments

IISD, IFPRI and Akademya2063 are organizing a series of consultations in order to share the results of the research, including inputs from national stakeholders, and with the aim of developing food system pathways to affordable and nutritious diets for all. The consultations will feed in the United Nations Food Systems Summit.

  • May 19th, 2021 in Malawi, in partnership with the Malawi Department of Nutrition, HIV, and AIDS
  • In Ethiopia (date tbd)
  • In Nigeria (date tbd)

The project is funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) and the European Commission, through the GIZ implemented projects Knowledge for Nutrition (K4N) and Agricultural Policy and Food and Nutrition Security as a contribution to the 2021 UN Food Systems Summit. The results will contribute to the Summit’s goal of providing healthy diets for all, in a sustainable way and will be published to coincide with the dates of the Summit.

 

Project details

Topic
Food and Agriculture
Region
Africa
Focus area
Economies