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Trade

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International trade has enormous potential to foster or frustrate sustainable development.

By allowing for specialization, trade can increase income and contribute to increased well-being. Openness to investment and trade can bring new environmentally friendly technologies and processes. But trade can also allow powerful global demand to deplete countries' natural resources and create increased pollution, and the benefits of trade are not always well distributed among and within nations. In seeking positive outcomes, IISD focuses on both on national-level trade policies and trade rules agreed at the World Trade Organization and in regional agreements. 

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