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Michael Rennie

Michael Rennie

Research Fellow, IISD-ELA

Dr. Rennie’s research interests focus on understanding the role of ecosystem change (e.g., climate change, commercial and recreational fishing, species invasions) on the aquatic community structure and energetics, and understanding how behavioural and life history variation in of aquatic organisms drives population and ecosystem-level processes. His research articles have been published in a variety of scientific journals, and he has been a lecturer and adjunct professor at several Canadian universities.

Prior to joining IISD in 2014, Dr. Michael Rennie was a research scientist with Fisheries and Oceans Canada, leading independent research at the Experimental Lakes Area, participating in highly collaborative whole-lake manipulation studies and collaborating with university researchers and government agencies. He was Postdoctoral Fellow at Trent University from 2008-2010, where he investigated temporal changes in food web structure associated with environmental change and species invasion of Lake Simcoe.

Since 2015, Dr. Rennie has been a Canada Research Chair in Aquatic Ecology and Fisheries and Assistant Professor at Lakehead University, where he continues to maintain a strong research program at the IISD Experimental Lakes Area as a Research Fellow.

Kidd, K.A, Paterson, M.J, Rennie, M.D., Podemski, C.L., Findlay, D.L., Blanchfield, P.J. and Liber, K. Responses of a freshwater food web to a potent synthetic oestrogen. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society Series B. 369: 20130578. doi: 10.1098/rstb.2013.0578 http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/369/1656/20130578

Rennie, M.D. Evans D.O. and Young, J.D. 2013. Increased dependence on nearshore benthic resources in the Lake Simcoe ecosystem after dreissenid invasion. Inland Waters 3: 297-310. doi: 10.5268/IW-3.2.540 https://www.fba.org.uk/journals/index.php/IW/article/view/540

Rennie, M.D., Sprules, W.G. and Johnson, T. 2009. Resource switching in fish following a major food web disruption. Oecologia, 159: 789–802. doi: 10.1007/s00442-008-1271-z http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00442-008-1271-z

A full list of publications is attached.


Phone: (807) 226-5162 ext. 251
  • Education

    Doctor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (2008): University of Toronto

    Master of Science–Zoology (2003): University of Toronto

    Bachelor of Science–Ecology (1999): University of Calgary