Purpose of the Guide

Too many gatherings are characterized by packed agendas, endless PowerPoint presentations, and little time for creativity, interaction or problem solving. Image: [CC BY 2.0] via Flickr

Successfully developing and implementing a National Adaptation Plan (NAP) process requires high levels of collaboration, often between groups who have not worked together and who might have strong differences of opinion on how to proceed. This collaboration might be cross-ministerial, with civil society organizations, with the private sector, and even with researchers and the media. In all of these cases, it is essential to create spaces where people can work together to better understand the challenges and prioritize adaptation actions that will help the country confront the impacts of climate change. As a result, the path to effective NAP planning and effective adaptation is one of many gatherings, meetings, workshops and forums. Some of these gatherings generate ground-breaking ideas, foster new partnerships and inspire positive action. Many of them, sadly, do not. They are instead characterized by packed agendas, endless PowerPoint presentations, and little time for creativity, interaction or problem solving. This facilitation guide aims to address this problem, helping the people within ministries tasked with developing and implementing the NAP process to make their events as successful as they can possibly be.

The guide is based on approaches piloted by the NAP Global Network through seven Targeted Topic Forums (TTFs)—multi-day events that explored key themes related to the NAP process, including sectoral integration, financing and gender. Attended by government representatives from 23 countries, these international learning and knowledge-sharing events successfully shared technical know-how, facilitated peer-to-peer exchange and inspired advances in countries’ NAP processes around the world.

A common reflection from TTF participants after these events was how helpful they would find it to use these same facilitation approaches with their own departments or ministries. In response to these requests, we have developed this guide to share the approaches used during the TTFs so they can be applied in other domestic and international planning processes.

This guide is for people that want to hold inclusive, participatory events in which different stakeholders come together to collectively generate ideas and identify actions they will take to make progress toward adaptation. It will help move away from presentation-heavy meetings and invite people to think and plan differently for their next event.