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Communications and Awareness Strategies: Raising awareness about the health impacts of coal in Indonesia - Examples from India and China

Publication Overview

Communications and Awareness Strategies: Raising awareness about the health impacts of coal in Indonesia - Examples from India and China

Key Messages

  • The public outcry in India, China, and Indonesia over air pollution has been drawing their respective governments’ attention; in response, they have started taking measures to reduce air pollution from the combustion of fossil fuels, in some cases even shutting down coal power plants.
  • While the links between poor air quality, transportation sector emissions and smog from deforestation fires are well established in Indonesia, coal is still not seen as a main driver of air pollution.
  • With increased awareness, civil society in Indonesia can better demand actions that prioritize Indonesians’ health and well-being.

This policy brief showcases examples of successful awareness-raising campaigns on the health impacts of air pollution in countries like China and India, where coal is the main source of electricity. The public outcry in both countries has been drawing their respective governments’ attention; in response, they have started taking measures to reduce air pollution from the combustion of fossil fuels, in some cases even shutting down coal power plants.

Indonesia produces 60 per cent of its electricity using coal and is still investing in and expanding coal power plants. While the links between poor air quality, transportation sector emissions and smog from deforestation fires are well established in Indonesia, coal is still not seen as a main driver of air pollution. More importantly, the link between several diseases and air pollution is not yet widely understood and recognized in the country.

It is therefore important that the country’s citizens be made aware of these links and the health hazards of air pollution. With increased awareness, civil society can better demand actions that prioritize Indonesians’ health and well-being. The examples listed in this policy brief should serve as an inspiration, and can even be replicated in Indonesia, with the hopes of creating a call to action among Indonesian citizens.